Jul 05, 2020  
Academic Program Manuals 2019-2020 
    
Academic Program Manuals 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Programs Policies & Procedures



Welcome to the Clinical Laboratory Science programs. We want you to be successful and we are here to assist you in every way possible. These programs will provide you with a variety of learning experiences to prepare you for your role in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

Program Policy Manual

The purpose of this CLS Program Policy Manual is to serve as a guide for all students enrolled in the individual programs. It is a supplement to the Indian Hills Community College Student Handbook and Planner and the College Catalog. All policies and regulations from the handbook and catalog are to be observed in addition to those outlined in these following pages.

Indian Hills Community College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, member of the North Central Association and the State of Iowa, Iowa Department of Education. The Medical Laboratory Technology and the Clinical Laboratory Assistant programs are accredited/approved, respectively, through the following agency:

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) 5600 N. River Rd, Suite 720
Rosemont, Illinois 60018
(773)714-8880
Email: naaclsinfo@naacls.org

The Medical Laboratory Technology, Clinical Laboratory Assistant, and Phlebotomy Technician programs are part of the Health Sciences Division at Indian Hills Community College. The staff and administration of the Health Sciences Division of Indian Hills Community College have developed this program policy manual.

We welcome you and want you to know we are here to assist you in every way possible. We want to you to succeed. It is a privilege to have each of you in these programs.

Faculty/Staff Directory

For a full listing of Faculty members please visit the faculty directory in the College Catalog & Student Handbook or search the Online Faculty/Staff Directory.

Indian Hills Mission, Values and Purpose

Mission

Indian Hills Community College changes lives by inspiring learning, diversity, social enrichment, and regional economic advancement.

Values

  • Academic Excellence and Student Success
  • Integrity, Relationships, and Teamwork
  • Acceptance, Inclusion, and Accessibility
  • Tradition and Culture
  • Innovation and the Future

Purpose

Indian Hills Community College is dedicated to providing a dynamic and timely response to the ever- changing needs of our business community and the populace of our small towns and rural areas.

In this context, it is our purpose to provide, to the greatest extent possible, the following education opportunities and services.

  • The first two years of college work, including pre-professional education.
  • Career and technical training.
  • Programs for in-service training and retraining of workers.
  • Programs for high school completions for students of post-high school age.
  • Programs for all students of high school age who may best serve themselves by enrolling for career and technical training, while also enrolled in a local high school, public or private.
  • Programs for students of high school age to provide advanced college placement courses not taught at a student’s high school while the student is also enrolled in the high school.
  • Student personnel services.
  • Community services.
  • Career and technical education for persons who have academic, socioeconomic or other disabilities which prevent succeeding in regular career education programs.
  • Training,  retraining  and  all  necessary  preparation  for  productive  employment  of  all citizens.
  • Career and technical training for persons who are not enrolled in a high school and who have not completed high school.
  • Developmental education for persons who are academically or personally under prepared to succeed in their program of study.

Non-Discrimination Statement

To view the full Non-Discrimination Statement, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook or the college website.

Admissions Policy

All students entering Indian Hills Community College (IHCC) Health Sciences programs are required to submit the following documents:

  • High school transcripts can be unofficial copies, however they must be sent from the school to IHCC.
  • Approved placement exams for Health Science programs include ACT, SAT, Accuplacer Classic and Accuplacer Next Generation.
    • Accuplacer results must be completed within two years prior to the program start term.
    • Students are only allowed to complete the Accuplacer exam three (3) times within a calendar year with a minimum of two (2) weeks between exams.
    • ACT/SAT results must be completed within five (5) years prior to the program start term.
  • Official College transcripts (if applicable) must be mailed to IHCC using the address below.
    • Grade Point Average (GPA) transferred in from an accredited higher education institution requires at least eight (8) cumulative college credit hours from one institution in order to be used for the screening process.

Clinical  Laboratory Science Program Admissions Requirements

Program GPA Accuplacer Classic Composite Accuplacer New Generation Composite SAT ACT
Medical Laboratory Technology 2.5
Sentence Skills Reading Arithmetic
64 80 60

204

Writing Reading Arithmetic
245 245 245
735 880 16
Clinical Lab Assistant 2.0
Sentence Skills Reading Arithmetic
64 80 60

204

Writing Reading Arithmetic
240 240 240
720 880 16
Phlebotomy Technician 2.0
Sentence Skills Reading Arithmetic
75 60

Sentence Skills Reading Arithmetic
240* 240*
780 14

*Phlebotomy Technician must meet both GPA & ACT/SAT OR meet 2 of 3 (GPA, Reading, Arithmetic)*

Academic Misconduct Policy

To view the full Academic Misconduct Policy, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Social Media Policy

Social Media is a dynamic platform for interaction through words, images, audio and video.  Examples of these sites include, but are not limited to:  Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube and many more. The Clinical Lab Science Programs at Indian Hills Community College respects the rights of its faculty and students to use social media outlets as a means of self -expression.  However, posts made on social media sites may become viral at any time or may be available on public platforms potentially permanently; even when they have been deleted from the website to which they were originally posted.  Social media sites have the potential to reflect both negatively and positively on any user’s future and their future employment.  Students and faculty at IHCC have both ethical and legal obligations with any social media communications.  Thus, IHCC has adopted this social media policy for its faculty and students.  It is the expectation of the college that its content will be adhered to.

The intent of the policy is not to restrict the flow of communication, but to provide guidance for professional, ethical and legal interactions for all of the participants.  The following, are examples of students conduct that in any form of social media are considered unprofessional and may result in disciplinary action and or dismissal from the program.              

  • Posting or discussing confidential patient/family information or photographs.  IHCC considers confidentiality of our patients and families to be of the utmost importance.  Any direct or indirect disclosure of patient or family information is subject to disciplinary action/termination.
  • Posting or discussing information about IHCC, IHCC Services, clients, employees, or anyone associated with the college.
  • Posting or discussing defamatory or false information about IHCC, college services, clients, vendors, employees or anyone associated with the college that is disparaging in nature.
  • Harassing of discriminatory postings of any discussions concerning anyone associated with IHCC.   Students are expressly prohibited from using any social media platform to harass, bully or intimidate other students, faculty or anyone associated with the college.  This would include the following: Derogatory comments with regard to race, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, genetic information, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, marital status, political beliefs, Veteran status, etc.  This includes any and all other protected class or status information recognized by federal, state and local laws.
  • Sexually suggestive, humiliating or demeaning comments.
  • Threats to intimidate of physically harm an employee, student, of anyone associated or affiliated with the college.
  • Speaking or posting in any way on behalf of the college without explicit permission of the President of the College.
  • Posting work related pictures of college employees, students of anyone associated with the college without that persons’ permission.
  • Students are not allowed to access social media sites during any class or clinical without the express permission of the classroom or clinical instructor.  Students doing this for any non-school related purposes will be subject to disciplinary action/termination.
  • Additionally, students who identify themselves in any social media platform as an IHCC student must recognize and adhere to the following additional guidelines.  Others may view you as a representative of the college.  Because of this distinct possibility, students who choose to identify themselves in this manner are required, as a condition of their enrollment, to observe some additional guidelines when referring to the college, college employees, faculty, its’ programs and activities.  Students who identify themselves as an IHCC student must be respectful of all social media platforms and communications that make reference to IHCC, its employees, faculty or anyone associated with IHCC.  Any obscenities, profanity, vulgar language or images are prohibited.
  • Any discussions referencing conduct that is prohibited by the college or college policies is prohibited.

Any failure on the part of the student to comply with these guidelines for social media conduct will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the college.

Clinical Laboratory Science Programs

Mission Statement

The mission of the Clinical Laboratory Science Programs of Indian Hills Community College is to be an exemplary program graduating highly qualified individuals to fill the employment needs of clinical laboratories. The Programs are committed to serving students and the medical laboratory community through guidance, excellent academic instruction and professional training utilizing traditional and innovative means while understanding the cultural diversity of individuals, maintaining a student- centered philosophy, striving to make wise use of community and educational resources and materials. The faculty of the CLS programs is committed to providing quality instruction by preparing the graduate to be employable at an entry level and to be successful on the professional certification examinations.

Essential Functions

The applicant/student needs to be adequately informed of all demands and expectations of a program or profession so that they can determine his/her ability to meet these expectations. The following are essential functions of the non-academic demands of the program which all applicants and enrolled students of the Medical Laboratory Technology, Clinical Laboratory Assistant, or Phlebotomy Technician programs will be expected to meet. Essential functions specific to a particular profession are delineated in parentheses.

The applicant/student must be able to:

Observation:

  • Participate actively in all demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences in the professional component of the degree.
  • Accurately observe demonstrations and exercises in which biological fluids are analyzed and products are being tested for their biochemical, hematological, immunological, microbiological and histochemical components.
  • (MLT; CLA = waived/POCT testing only) Analyze patient specimens (blood, urine, body fluids, cell samplings, tissues, etc) using a variety of manual and automated techniques.
  • Characterize color, odor, clarity and viscosity of biological fluids, reagents or chemical reaction products. These determinations might be made by the aid of simple and complex instruments and microscopes.
  • (MLT only) Discriminate colors, patterns, and structural detail of microscopic specimens.
  • Assess and comprehend the condition of all patients assigned to them for sample procurement, and (MLT only) examination, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • (In summary, have functional use of visual, auditory, and somatic sensations.)

Communication:

  • Communicate effectively and sensitively with patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture.
  • Assess non-verbal communications.
  • Read and comprehend written material is essential in order to correctly and independently follow procedures and policies, and to perform laboratory test procedures (e.g., MLT - all tests; CLA/PBT - POC/waived tests).
  • Effectively and efficiently transmit information and instructions to patients, students, faculty, staff, and all members of the healthcare team.
  • (Communication skills include speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the observation skills described above, and must utilize the English language.

Psychomotor Skills: 

  • Have  sufficient  motor  function  to  elicit  information  from  patients  by  appropriate  diagnostic  or therapeutic maneuvers.
  • Perform basic tests and in-vitro assays, including multiple concurrent and repetitive tasks. Possess all skills necessary to carry out diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.
  • Interpret appropriate examinations and procedures.
  • Possess the psychomotor skills necessary to collect blood specimens, manipulate instruments that require eye-hand coordination, perform manual laboratory procedures with dexterity, and operate computers, and perform all tasks that are normally expected within the scope of practice for the practitioner in the workplace.
  • Lift twenty pounds and to move light equipment, as might be required in the workplace. Bend, reach, sit and move freely about the laboratory.
  • Use a keyboard; maneuver, manipulate, adjust, and control lab equipment, instruments and supplies.

Intellectual/Conceptual, Integrative, and Cognitive Abilities:

  • Measure, calculate, reason, analyze, synthesize, evaluate, integrate and apply information, which, due to the detailed nature of some laboratory tasks, may require long periods of concentration. (All are included in problem solving.)
  • Use  sufficient  and  sound  judgment  to  recognize  and  correct  performance  and  to  problem  solve unexpected observations or outcomes of laboratory test procedures.
  • Comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures. Perform these problem solving skills in a timely fashion.

Behavioral and Social Attributes:

  • Possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities fully, such as in exercising sound judgment, promptly completing all responsibilities, being able to work in and adapt to changing and stressful environment, displaying flexibility, and functioning independently in the face of taxing workloads, uncertainties, or problems that might arise.
  • Be flexible, creative, and adaptable to change and stress, willing to change, and cooperative with peers and supervisors.
  • Possess compassion and concern for patients and others.

Ethical Standards:

  • Demonstrate professional demeanor and behavior and must perform in an ethical, moral manner in dealing with peers, faculty, staff, and patients.
  • Possess integrity, commitment, and motivation.

Academic Performance:

  • Obtain and correlate relevant information from lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions or exercises, clinical laboratory internships, and independent study assignments.
  • Use computer-based examinations to assess and improve educational outcomes of the program.
  • Sit for examinations, both written and oral, complete written assignments, deliver presentations, and perform the required laboratory practice with and without supervision.

Medical Laboratory Technology

Goals

The Indian Hills Community College Medical Laboratory Technology Program will prepare the graduate for the skills, knowledge and professional attributes necessary to begin a successful career as a Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT).

The MLT Program provides education at the associate degree level to help meet the employment needs of laboratories in the region. It is the College’s goal to help and motivate the student to develop his/her optimum level of performance, and gain entry-level competency. As a graduate of the MLT Program the student will be prepared to work within the health care team to provide quality health care and maintenance of optimum health for all individuals of the society.

MLT Program Goals

  • Apply basic knowledge, principles, and concepts, in order to/and perform as a competent, entry- level Medical Laboratory Technician.
  • Apply critical/analytical thinking, interpretive, and problem solving skills as appropriate for a Medical Laboratory Technician.
  • Utilize effective and appropriate communication.
  • Maintain professional, legal, and ethical standards of practice.
  • Develop an appreciation and awareness for professional growth and lifelong learning.
  • Provide the area healthcare communities with graduates possessing the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to function as a competent Medical Laboratory Technician.

Description

Description of the Profession

The Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) is an allied health professional who is qualified by academic and practical training to provide service in clinical laboratory science. The MLT must also be responsible for his/her own actions, as defined by the profession.

The ability to relate to people, a capacity for calm and reasoned judgment, and a demonstration of commitment to the patient are qualities essential for a clinical laboratory technician. The MLT must demonstrate ethical and moral attitudes and principles which are essential for gaining and maintaining the trust of professional associates, the support of the community, and the confidence of the patient and family. An attitude of respect for the patient and confidentiality of the patient’s record and/or diagnoses must be maintained.

Description of Career Entry

(Source:     Preamble  to  the  Standards  of  Accredited  Educational  Programs  for  the  Clinical Laboratory Technician/Medical Laboratory Technician, October 2001.)

At career entry, the Medical Laboratory Technician will be able to perform routine clinical laboratory tests as the primary analyst, making specimen-oriented decisions on predetermined criteria, and incorporating a working knowledge of critical values. Communication skills will extend to frequent interactions with members of the healthcare team, external relations, customer service, and patient education. The level of analysis ranges from waived/point-of-care testing to complex testing encompassing all major areas of the clinical laboratory. The clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician will have diverse functions in areas of analysis, information processing, training, troubleshooting, and quality control monitoring wherever clinical laboratory testing is performed.

The following is a brief list of an indication of the type of work performed by a MLT:

  • Works in a laboratory under the direction of a Medical Technologist and/or Supervisor
  • Uses a number of instruments in the laboratory for analyzing and testing
  • Keeps the laboratory clean and well-organized
  • Keeps records of tests
  • Uses math to make solutions or to calculate patient results
  • Handles test slides and fragile equipment
  • Uses a laboratory computer system in some settings

The skills and abilities required of an MLT include:

  • Works under pressure when test results are needed quickly
  • Sees well for microscope study and is able to make fine adjustments
  • Works independently following prescribed procedures
  • Cooperates and gets along with other hospital staff
  • Performs activities in an organized and detailed manner
  • Has self-discipline and takes initiative in identifying learning needs
  • Communicates well
  • Works with speed and accuracy

Overview

The Indian Hills Community College Medical Laboratory Technology program prepares the student to perform complex laboratory procedures with a limited amount of supervision. This program is 8 terms in length and includes a 22-week hospital laboratory internship/clinical assignment at the end of the program (excluding the phlebotomy internship, which occurs during Term II). Graduates are awarded an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree from Indian Hills Community College. Graduates typically find employment in hospital, clinic and physician office laboratories; however, opportunities for employment also exist in blood collection and blood testing facilities (i.e. blood donor centers), public health laboratories, veterinary offices, and industrial laboratories. Graduates are eligible to take the national professional certification examination in Medical Laboratory Technology.

Competencies

(Adapted from CAHEA program guidelines)

After completing the Indian Hills Community College Medical Laboratory Technology Program the graduate will be able to:

  • Collect and process biological specimens for analysis.
  • Perform analytical tests on body fluids, cells, and other specimens and products.
  • Recognize factors that affect procedures and results.
  • Troubleshoot problem situations and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits when corrections are indicated.
  • Monitor quality control within predetermined limits.
  • Perform preventive and corrective maintenance of equipment and instruments or referring to appropriate source for repairs.
  • Demonstrate  professional  conduct  and  interpersonal  communication  skills  with  patients, laboratory personnel, other health care professionals, and with the public.
  • Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care professionals and interact with them with respect for their jobs and patient care.
  • Apply basic scientific principles in learning new techniques and procedures.
  • Relate laboratory findings to common disease processes.
  • Protect patients and self from transmission of infectious disease.
  • Recognize and act upon individual needs for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
  • Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, computing, problem-solving, critical thinking, interpersonal relations, leadership, and time management.
Are you coming in to the MLT program with a BS degree already?
  1. If you have a BS degree, you most likely would have already taken the Summer Term courses (Term I of the MLT Program). You can apply as a “Late Entry” to the MLT Program, and come in to the MLT program in the Fall term.
  1. If you experience any challenges with summer courses transferring in, or you still need one of the scheduled courses, arrangements can be made for a Customized Contract, which would allow the completion of the course out of the usual scheduled sequence, sometime during the early terms in the MLT program.
  1. Financial aid for the MLT program would begin Fall Term using the new academic year FAFSA application. To obtain Financial Aid for the first summer, you need to complete a FAFSA for that academic year. The summer term is part of the previous academic year, as far as financial aid is concerned.
  1. If any scholarship monies are awarded to students, the availability of the scholarship will begin for Fall Term (Term II of the MLT program), not the Summer start term.
Are you coming in to the MLT program from another HS or CLS program?
Please see the Program Director for a Customized Contract to move through the program as efficiently as possible.
We want you all to be successful in the MLT program.  See the Program Director for options.

Curriculum

To view the full program curriculum, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Students transferring from another college or another HS program will be evaluated, counseled, and advised on an individual basis.

Note:

  • Must have a “C” or better in all program/MLT core courses and the specified support courses (*).Health Science Certifications (HIPAA, Blood Borne Pathogens, and Child and Adult Abuse Mandatory Reporting) must be completed by week 3 of initial core course for each CLS program.

MLT Program Core courses contain “MLT” prior to the course number.

Degree: Associate of Applied Science, Medical Laboratory Technology

Professional Certification Eligibility: Medical Laboratory Technician, MLT (ASCP)

Core Course Descriptions

To view the course descriptions, please click on the links below. (must be updated for each program) 

Medical Laboratory Technology:

  • MLT 104 - Laboratory Math
  • MLT 114 - MLT Fundamentals Bridge
  • MLT 115 - Clinical Lab Fundamentals
  • MLT 120 - Urinalysis
  • MLT 165 - Medical Lab. Principles and Techniques
  • MLT 166 - MLT Critical Analysis
  • MLT 180 - Clinical Lab Practicum I
  • MLT 181 - Clinical Lab Practicum II
  • MLT 182 - Clinical Lab Practicum III
  • MLT 232 - Advanced Hematology and Coagulation
  • MLT 245 - Clinical Chemistry
  • MLT 253 - Parasitology and Mycology
  • MLT 255 - Clinical Microbiology
  • MLT 261 - Immunohematology
  • MLT 270 - Immunology and Serology
  • MLT 290 - Clinical Seminar and Review
  • MLT 296 - Topics in Clinical Laboratory

Clinical Laboratory Assistant

Goals

The Indian Hills Community College Clinical Laboratory Assistant Program will prepare the graduate for the skills, knowledge and professional attributes necessary to begin a successful career as a Clinical Laboratory Assistant.

The CLA Program provides education at the diploma level to help meet the employment needs of laboratories in the region. It is the College’s goal to help and motivate the student to develop his/her optimum level of performance, and gain entry-level competency. As a graduate of the CLA Program the student will be prepared to work within the health care team to provide quality health care and maintenance of optimum health for all individuals of the society.

CLA Program Goals

  • Apply basic knowledge, principles, and concepts, in order to/and perform as a competent, entry-level Clinical Laboratory Assistant.
  • Apply critical/analytical thinking, interpretive, and problem solving skills as appropriate for a Clinical Laboratory Assistant.
  • Utilize effective and appropriate communication.
  • Maintain professional, legal, and ethical standards of practice.
  • Develop an appreciation and awareness for professional growth and lifelong learning.
  • Provide the area healthcare communities with graduates possessing the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to function as a competent Clinical Laboratory Assistant.

Description

In addition to collecting blood specimens, the clinical laboratory assistant prepares the specimens for analysis, assesses the quality of the specimens, prepares analytical reagents and controls, performs maintenance on laboratory instruments, inventories reagents and supplies, loads specimens onto laboratory analyzers, and performs testing appropriate for the clinical assistant level (such as waived and/or point-of-care testing) amongst other duties. The CLA (or CA) uses effective communication skills with patients and various healthcare professionals and identifies and reports potential pre- analytical errors that may occur.

Overview

The Clinical Laboratory Assistant Program is a nine month diploma program designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in clinical laboratory settings such as medical centers and outpatient laboratory facilities. Clinical laboratory assistants perform phlebotomy, specimen processing, quality control, and laboratory orientation and regulation under the supervision of physicians or laboratory scientists or technologists. The program includes instruction in computer skills, laboratory billing practices, and the performance of assistant-level testing according to the standard operating procedures.

The Indian Hills Community College Clinical Laboratory Assistant program prepares the student to perform point-of-care and waived laboratory procedures with a limited amount of supervision, in addition to Phlebotomy. This program is 3 terms (9 months), 28-credits in length and includes 4 weeks of hospital laboratory internship/clinical assignment. Students who complete the program are awarded a Diploma from Indian Hills Community College. Graduates typically find employment in hospital, clinic and physician office laboratories; however, opportunities for employment also exist in blood collection and blood testing facilities (i.e. blood centers), public health laboratories, veterinary offices, and industrial laboratories. Graduates are eligible to take the national professional certification examination in Phlebotomy.

Continuing on to the MLT Program from CLA?
If you thinking about continuing on the to the MLT program, here are some things you should know or think about early in the CLA program.
  1. The MLT Program is a summer start program. During the first Summer term, you will be taking Introduction to Chemistry, Intermediate Algebra (you’ve already taken the scheduled Communications course). This would start right after you complete the CLA program.
  1. Financial aid for the MLT program would not begin until Fall Term. The summer term is part of the previous academic year, as far as financial aid is concerned.  A FAFSA application is “good” for Fall through Summer. You need to fill out a new FAFSA application for each Fall term that you are here. If you are on financial aid assistance, you need to consider spreading out your financial aid from just 3 terms of the CLA Program to 4 terms for the academic year, in order to cover the first term of the MLT program.
  1. If any scholarship monies are awarded to students, the availability of the scholarship will be for Fall Term (Term II of the MLT program).
  1. If you experience any challenges with a summer course, e.g. Intermediate Algebra course, do not be discouraged and or quit the MLT program. Contact the Program Director immediately, and make arrangements through a Customized Contract, which would allow the completion of the course outside the usual scheduled sequence, sometime during the early terms in the MLT program.
  1. Consider a dual major, Associate of Applied Science (AAS) MLT and Associate of Science (AS) Arts & Science. This will enable any additional courses that you might take to make a minimum of 8 credits/term for financial aid to be applied to an AS degree as well.
We want you all to be successful in the MLT program.  See the Program Director for options.

Competencies

After completing the Indian Hills Community College Clinical Laboratory Assistant Program the graduate will be able to:

  • Collect and process biological specimens for analysis (including for reference laboratory testing), and demonstrate knowledge of equipment, proper techniques, and importance in overall patient care.
  • Perform point of care and waived analytical testing on urine and whole blood specimens and other appropriate specimens.
  • Describe and perform all aspects of requisitioning and specimen transport, preservation, and processing.
  • Describe and evaluate quality assurance in phlebotomy.
  • Perform and monitor quality control materials within acceptable limits.
  • Perform preventive maintenance of equipment and instruments.
  • Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care professionals and interact with them with respect for their jobs and patient care.
  • Protect patients and self from transmission of infectious disease.
  • Recognize and fulfill individual needs for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.

Curriculum

To view the full program curriculum, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Students transferring from another college or another HS program will be evaluated, counseled, and advised on an individual basis.

Note:

  • Must have a “C” or better in all program/CLA core courses and the specified support courses (*).
  • Health Science Certifications (HIPAA, Blood Borne Pathogens, and Child and Adult Abuse Mandatory Reporting) must be completed by week 3 of initial core course for each CLS program.

CLA Program Core courses contain “MLT” prior to the course number.

Degree: Diploma, Clinical Laboratory Assistant

Professional Certification Eligibility: Phlebotomy Technician, PBT (ASCP)

Note:

  • ASCP is currently developing a certification exam for Medical Laboratory Assistant.

Core Course Descriptions

Medical Laboratory Technology:

  • MLT 113 - CLA Basics Bridge
  • MLT 175 - CLA Practicum I
  • MLT 176 - CLA Practicum II
  • MLT 135 - Clinical Laboratory Basics I
  • MLT 136 - Clinical Laboratory Basics II
  • MLT 137 - Clinical Laboratory Basics III
  • MLT 295 - Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science I

Phlebotomy Technician

Goals

The Indian Hills Community College Phlebotomy Technician Program will prepare the graduate for the skills, knowledge and professional attributes necessary to begin a successful career as a Phlebotomy Technician.

The Phlebotomy Technician Program provides education at the certificate level to help meet the employment needs of laboratories and physicians’ offices in the region. It is the College’s goal to help and motivate the student to develop his/her optimum level of performance, and gain entry-level competency. As a graduate of the Phlebotomy Technician Program the student will be prepared to work within the health care team to provide quality health care and maintenance of optimum health for all individuals of the society.

PBT Program Goals

  • Apply basic knowledge and concepts, and perform as a competent, entry-level Phlebotomy Technician in the collection and transport of various types of specimens for analysis.
  • Apply critical/analytical thinking, interpretive, and problem solving skills as appropriate for a Phlebotomy Technician.
  • Utilize effective and appropriate communication.
  • Maintain professional, legal, and ethical standards of practice.
  • Develop an appreciation and awareness for professional growth and lifelong learning.
  • Provide the area healthcare communities with graduates possessing the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to function as a competent Phlebotomy Technician.

Description

This 9-credit certificate program is designed to provide educations experiences which prepare the student for a professional career in the healthcare system. Laboratory professionals require specimens that have been obtained promptly and properly by qualified phlebotomists. As an integral member the laboratory team, the phlebotomist must be trained in all aspects of specimen collections and processing. It is also vitally important that this key person be able to maintain high professional standards in dealing with patients other healthcare professionals.

Overview

The Indian Hills Community College Phlebotomy Technician program prepares the student to perform various types of phlebotomy procedures. This program is 2 terms (6 months) in length and includes 3 weeks of hospital laboratory internship/clinical assignment. Students who complete the program are awarded a Certificate from Indian Hills Community College. Graduates typically find employment in hospital, clinic and physician office laboratories; however, opportunities for employment also exist in blood collection and blood testing facilities (i.e. blood centers), public health laboratories, veterinary offices, and industrial laboratories. Graduates are eligible to take the national professional certification examination in Phlebotomy.

Competencies

Upon completion of this program the student will be able to successfully:

  • Collect  and  process  biological  specimens  for  analysis,  and  demonstrate  knowledge  of equipment, proper techniques, and importance in overall patient care.
  • Describe and perform all aspects of requisitioning and specimen transport, preservation, and processing.
  • Describe and evaluate quality assurance in phlebotomy.
  • Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care professionals and interact with them with respect for their jobs and patient care.
  • Protect patients and self from transmission of infectious disease.
  • Recognize and fulfill individual needs for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
Continuing on to the MLT program?
Please see the Program Director for a Customized Contract to move through the program as efficiently as possible and to thoroughly evaluate your options.
We want you all to be successful in the MLT program.  See the Program Director for options.

Curriculum

To view the full program curriculum, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Students transferring from another college or another HS program will be evaluated, counseled, and advised on an individual basis.

If choosing to go on to CLA or MLT programs, credit will be given for related courses taken, and the appropriate bridge course (MLT113 or MLT114) will need to be taken to meet the requirements of MLT135/MLT115.

Note:

  • Must have a “C” or better in all program/MLT/PBT core courses
  • Health Science Certifications (HIPAA, Blood Borne Pathogens, and Child and Adult Abuse Mandatory Reporting) must be completed by week 3 of initial core course for each CLS program.

PBT Program Core courses contain “MLT” or “PHB” prior to the course number.

Degree: Certificate, Phlebotomy Technician

Professional Certification Eligibility: Phlebotomy Technician, PBT (ASCP)

Core Course Descriptions

Medical Laboratory Technology:

  • MLT 112 - Priciples of Phlebotomy

Phlebotomy:

  • PHB 270 - Phlebotomy Clinical

Completion of Programs/Graduation

The students who successfully complete the individual program’s requirements will be awarded the appropriate Associate of Applied Science Degree, Diploma, or Certificate. The granting of these degrees and awards is not contingent upon the student’s passing of any type of external certification or licensure examination.

Student Responsibilities

General

Entry into a professional program entails responsibilities as well as rights. The following outlines student responsibilities in all the Clinical Laboratory Science programs. Included are professional responsibilities for being accountable in practice and respecting others and one’s self, as well as responsibilities for being an active participant in the learning process and for one’s role as a learner.

Students in the CLS programs will be expected to:

Didactic/Classroom:

  • Attend classes and lab experiences regularly
  • Participate in class and small group discussion
  • Assume responsibility for own learning and development by:
    • coming prepared for class and lab activities.
    • completing assignments on time with written work being done legibly and in the proper format.
    • accepting constructive criticism and supervision by others and using suggestions for growth.
    • monitoring own progress in meeting course objectives and seeking out needed learning experiences and instructor assistance
    • using  appropriate  resources  and  references  to  increase  knowledge  base  and  improve performance.
    • scheduling  appointments  with  instructor(s)  for  assistance  with  class  assignments  and obtaining materials that were missed due to any absence.
  • Be accountable for own judgments, actions or non-actions, and choices. There will be no outbursts of anger, out-of-control behavior, arguing, or swearing, to name a few examples, in the classroom.
  • Adhere to Universal Precautions and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Blood Borne Pathogen standards including the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and adherence to Exposure Control Plans. Any exposure incident is to be reported to the instructor immediately.
  • Follow all safety rules and practices.
  • Adhere to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) during class discussions, clinical experiences and clinical practicum rotations.
  • Call the course instructor if you are going to be absent or late.
  • Make arrangements for and complete make-up assignments after any missed class. Please note that some labs may not be able to be made-up. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor about making up missed labs or assignments. It is also the student’s responsibility to obtain any materials missed due to his or her absence. See individual course syllabi for specific requirements.
  • Be a willing participant in laboratory situations when other students need patients to practice phlebotomy or other laboratory procedures.
  • All documents for program courses must be submitted using Word, Power Point, or other commonly accepted software programs.
  • Follow appropriate channels of communication to resolve concerns over testing and evaluation procedures or classroom activities. (Instructor-Program Director-Department Chair-Dean)

CLS Hybrid Program courses (on-line and face-to-face combination):

As with on-line course, such as HSC Employment Preparation, those program course that are hybrid (lecture component is online; laboratory component is held in the CLS classroom) require the student to take the initiative.

Expectations of the student in these program courses (on-line or hybrid):

  • The student is expected to abide by the course schedules, whether there is a face-to-face meeting first or not. If deadlines are missed, then points are lost (from a percentage to possibly all points). The course schedules can be located on MyHills within each specific course.
  • The students will use the designated drop boxes for these courses to submit their assignments.
  • Communicate with the instructor at all times, via course email, when they cannot attend the laboratory component, or if an emergency arose…

Clinical Practicum

A vital element of all the CLS curricula is the clinical practicum/internship (i.e., clinical rotation). Students may request geographical locations, but the program director and faculty make all final placement decisions.

  • Clinical affiliation provides an opportunity for students to gain experience in a hospital laboratory under the supervision of the staff. You will not be expected to function independently as an additional staff member, but you will be expected to perform routine laboratory procedures with minimal supervision that are expected for your level of education.
  • Clinical laboratory professionals do not expect to teach basic procedures of theory. The student must demonstrate this ability through satisfactory completion of all didactic course competencies and laboratory skills prior to any clinical experiences. If a student has not satisfactorily completed course work and demonstrated the ability to perform required procedures, he or she will not be allowed to progress on to a clinical assignment. The instructor must be sure that all students will be safe practitioners at the level expected for students in the final phase of the educational program.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to assure that all requirements have been completed and the appropriate signatures have been obtained.

Clinical Expectations

Clinical practicum evaluations will be based on performance in the clinical setting under the supervision of the staff. Students will be expected to apply the knowledge and skills gained from previous didactic course work, combined with professional attributes. During clinical practicum, the CLS student will be expected to:

  • Behave/perform as a professional by
    • Participating in clinical practicum on assigned days at assigned times. If the student is ill or has an emergency that prevents him or her from being at the clinical site, the student must notify both the Health Occupations Office and the clinical instructor. A student must have the required clinical hours to graduate from the program. Absences will mean making up these hours at the end of the semester at a time arranged with the clinical site supervisor/instructor.
    • Performing analysis with utmost care, accuracy and quality.
    • Following written/verbal procedures and instructions.
  • Safeguard the patient in the clinical setting by:
    • recognizing self-limitations.
    • seeking  out the physician/supervisor  when unsure of self or  when unable to  follow directions/guidelines given.
    • reporting errors or mistakes and following through with the needed action for remedy.
    • adhering to hospital policies, procedures, and routines.
    • recording and reporting patient care data accurately.
    • adhering to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regarding patient confidentiality.
  • Accept constructive criticism from supervisor and utilize suggestions for growth.
  • Develop attributes that reflect professional conduct and respect for one’s self and others, to include:
    • protect the patient’s right to privacy by maintaining strict confidentiality.
    • respect the human dignity and uniqueness of others regardless of social or economic status, personal attributes, or nature of health problems.
    • listen attentively and courteously when others are speaking.
    • demonstrate poise, tact, and self-control when communicating with others.
    • express self clearly and accurately both verbally and in written work.
    • offer assistance to others rather than waiting to be asked.
    • project a professional image/attitude during clinical activities.
  • Adhere to Universal/Standard Precautions and OSHA Blood borne Pathogen Standards including use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE’s) and adherence to agency Exposure Control Plans. Report any exposure incident to clinical supervisor and to the program director or instructor.

Student Conduct and Disciplinary Action

Program students, like all students at IHCC, are responsible for maintaining standards and adhering to regulations adopted by the college. Unsafe, unprofessional, dishonest or disruptive conduct may result in failure of the course or disciplinary action including suspension from class, clinical practicum or the program.

Program faculty members, as experienced practitioners, are in the best position to judge unsafe, disruptive, dishonest and/or unprofessional conduct. In addition, they have a professional obligation to protect the patients, classmates, and society against potential harm.

Dress Code

The CLS student represents the school and the profession. Therefore, it is imperative that certain standards be met and a dress code followed. During class periods, students may use their own judgment in attire, but it must conform to the codes of decency. While in the laboratory or at the clinical site, students are to abide by the following dress code. Students are expected to obey both the rules of the college as well as the clinical affiliate. Where there is a difference, they are to go by the stricter of the two.

On-Campus Labs

  • Students must follow these rules during all laboratory experiences:
  • Hair must be pulled back off the face.
  • Facial hair of men must be worn in such a manner that it will not obstruct activities.
  • CLS scrubs are to be worn during all student labs on campus. If you do not have scrubs on, you cannot participate the lab the lab exercise.
  • Students are required to wear a disposable, moisture barrier-proof lab coat when performing labs.
  • Closed-toe leather shoes are to be worn when in labs (no leather with holes, sandals, etc).
  • There are no shorts allowed during labs.

The safety rules for the laboratory described in more detail are located in the Appendices. The student will be expected to sign the receipt of these rules and to abide by them.

Clinical Experiences and Practicum

Although fashion trends in dress, accessories, hair color and hair styles are part of a student’s personal life, these same trends can be seen as less than professional by the public and detract from their perceptions of the student’s capability to practice safely. Therefore, CLS students’ dress and appearance for clinical experience and practicum must be professional.

Grooming and dress code policies are based on the following general standards:

Client Safety:

  • Tissue integrity - patients are to be protected from tissue damage from fingernails, jewelry, etc.
  • Infection control - patients are to be protected from known sources of infection, actual or potential

Professional Demeanor:

  • CLS students are expected to represent themselves, IHCC, and the clinical laboratory in a professional manner.

Compliance:

  • IHCC has an obligation to comply with the dress code standards of any clinical affiliates or agencies.

The following is not meant to be all-inclusive and any questions or concerns are to be brought to the Program Director. Student is expected to abide by whichever policy requirements that are more stringent.

  • Personal hygiene - since it is necessary to work very closely with patients, body odors and bad breath can be very unpleasant, especially to sick people, and may on occasion be annoying to fellow workers. It is your responsibility to perform the necessary cleansing of the body and utilize the required toiletries and personal hygiene aids.
  • Odors - of any kind may be offensive to patients or may make them sick. Products with strong odors (i.e. perfumes, tobacco, etc) must be avoided when in uniform or while working in the clinical site.
  • Hair - should be well-groomed, clean and neat. Long hair must be off the shoulders - tied back or up on head. There are to be no radical hair styles or colors.
  • Facial hair (men) - must be clean, trimmed, and worn in such a manner that it will not obstruct activities.
  • Make-up - is to be natural/subtle, in moderation.
  • Nails - are to be well-manicured without polish, and no longer than ¼ inch beyond end of fingers.  Any form of artificial nails is prohibited. This pertains to issues of infection control and safety.
  • Jewelry - with the exception of a wedding ring and wristwatch, is not to be worn in clinical.
  • Earrings - Only 2 pair of earrings per ear are allowed (regardless of how many holes are present), and no gauges. For pierced ears, earrings should be small, and simple. This is for the safety and protection of the student.  No other facial or body piercings must be visible.
  • Tongue rings or posts - may NOT be worn as they often prevent the student from speaking clearly or professionally. More importantly, this has to do with health and safety issues. The only visible body piercing that is acceptable is in the ear lobes.
  • Tattoos - There should be no visible tattoos. If on a visible area, they must be covered up.
  • Shoes - are to be leather of sturdy construction, with low heels, rubber soles, free from holes of any kind, and clean at all times.m  No sandals/canvas/tennis shoes, work boots, clogs, etc, are to be worn.
  • Dress Code – The Dress Code is to be observed with strict attention at the clinical site. Official CLS teal scrubs are to be worn for all student labs and all clinical experiences/internships, and are available for purchase through IHCC bookstore. These are to be clean (pressed if necessary). Tops must be long enough to cover hips. Slacks/pants must be full length. No shorts are allowed.  If skirts are desired, they must be at least knee length.
    • NO: jeans/denim attire, work boots, etc, are to be worn.
    • NO: T-shirts, shirts with printed messages, shorts, or jeans.

Students will be suspended from the clinical practicum area for continued failure to adhere to grooming and dress expectations.

Student Communications

Email

Students are expected to check their email at a minimum of once a day (or sometimes multiple times). Course and individual communications will be handled via email.

Phone Voicemail

The students are also expected to set up voice mail on their phone. Sometimes, we or the affiliate site may need to contact you. If you are not available, then it may be necessary to leave a message for you. It is unreasonable to expect others to repeatedly try to call you.

Occasionally you will encounter circumstances requiring assistance or guidance. The following is a partial list of potential problems and who to see:

Problem Who to See
Difficulty/concern with a specific course Instructor
Difficulty with course work in general or problems of a general nature Program Director
Associate Dean
Executive Dean
SUCCESS Center
Concerns about clinical rotations Clinical Coordinator
Program Director
Associate Dean
Executive Dean
Problems/Concerns at clinical site Clinical Instructor
Clinical Coordinator
Program Director
Associate Dean
Executive Dean
Information concerning Policies & Procedures Program Director
Associate Dean
Executive Dean
Personal Problems Program Director
Instructor
Associate Dean
Executive Dean
Concerns about the program Program Director
Associate Dean
Executive Dean

Feel free to talk to any staff member if you think they can help you.

Physical Examination and Immunizations

It is required that each student have a physical examination prior to starting the clinical component of the program to assure both the student and the affiliate that the student is physically able to participate in the activities required of a CLS student. Each student will have a physical performed by licensed qualified personnel.

In addition, documentation and/or results of the following immunizations/tests are required:

  • MMR or Rubella Titer
  • Mantoux Skin Test (2-step) for Tuberculosis (Annual TB tests, done at the beginning of 2nd yr. fall term, may consist of the one-step.)
  • Tetanus/Diphtheria Booster Hepatitis B
  • Varicella

If immunizations are not available then the student will need to have titers performed to verify immunization. If not immunized, then the actual immunizations will be needed. Student Health Services in Trustee Hall is able to provide these services for you.

The completed form will be uploaded to Castle Branch’s website. This physical examination form is available at www.indianhills.edu .

Criminal Background Checks and Drug Screen Policy

Criminal and Abuse Background Checks

National and State criminal and dependent adult/child abuse checks are required of every student preparing to enroll in an Indian Hills Community College Health Sciences program. The cost of the required checks is the responsibility of the student/applicant.

The Criminal and Dependent Adult/Child abuse background check procedure is established to meet the requirements for the partnerships between the College and the clinical facilities and/or sites. Students who have a criminal history, and are cleared to participate in an IHCC Health Sciences academic program, are still responsible to work with their professional licensing or certification board for determination if they are eligible to sit for that profession’s licensure or certification.

Timeline for completion of background check policy:

  • Check must be run PRIOR to the Last day to Drop of the first term of the program, or the student will not be allowed to participate in core class or labs.
  • Students who change from 1 IHCC Health Sciences program to another without a term between may use the first program’s check ONLY if it is no more than 12 months since the initial check was run.
  • Students  entering  the  ECE  program  must  undergo  that  specific  process  to  enter, regardless of previous checks.
  • Students who complete a Health Sciences program and have more than one term before the next program start will need to have the check repeated, no matter how long ago the first check was completed.

Criteria used to determine whether a student is ineligible to participate in an Indian Hills Community College Health Sciences program:

At Any Time
  • Refusal to participate in the background check or evaluation process.
  • Iowa DHS record check evaluation determines the student is not eligible to participate in the clinical portion of the course and/or to work in a health care facility.
  • A felony conviction.
  • A felony, serious misdemeanor or aggravated misdemeanor charge with an outstanding disposition or warrant.
  • A serious misdemeanor or aggravated misdemeanor conviction in which the probationary period has not been completed.
  • A criminal conviction, of any kind, related to past employment, and/or a healthcare system or organization.
  • Inclusion on the child, dependent adult and/or sexual abuse registry.
The Past 5 Years
  • A criminal conviction of any kind related to illegal distribution of theft of drugs.
The Past 2 Years
  • A serious or aggravated misdemeanor conviction of theft or a pattern of theft convictions.
The Past 1 Year
  • A criminal conviction related to the possession of drugs, paraphernalia, and/or illegal substances.
Any of the criteria listed below may disqualify you from enrollment in IHCC’s Health Sciences programs based on factors such as job/program relatedness, patterns, timeframes and/or completion of sentence.
  • Recent criminal conviction(s) or charges of any type.
  • A misdemeanor conviction involving domestic abuse with injury, violence, or sexual misconduct.
  • A pattern of criminal convictions or charges.
  • 2 or more OWI convictions.
While enrolled in any Health Sciences program at IHCC, it is expected that students report all child abuse, dependent adult abuse, and/or criminal activity, in which they are involved, to IHCC within forty-eight (48) hours of the incident.  Failure to do so could result in criminal charger per Iowa Code and removal from the program.

National/State Background Check

Students who enroll in a non-nursing Health Sciences programs will be required to complete a National Background Check and the Iowa Adult and Child Protective Services check through Castle Branch. The background check must be completed prior to starting the program or as directed by the program director. Students who fail to complete the required checks may not be able to attend laboratory or clinical.

Health Sciences Division Drug Screening

Students may be required by a clinical site to have a drug screen, or other additional testing, done prior to the beginning of a clinical rotation. Students are responsible for obtaining the drug screen/other test and for the paying of the fee. Changes in rotation/assignment schedules will not be made on the basis of this requirement.

All Health Science students will be required to have a drug screen prior to the clinical experience. The student portfolio (on the Castle Branch website) will contain the drug screen results. Those results will be available to both the student and program administrator.

The process will be as follows:

  • The student will be provided with information on setting up their account for the Castle Branch portal during the mandatory program orientation
  • The student will place an order and pay for the drug screen on the portal.
  • The student is responsible for the drug testing fee.
  • Castle Branch accepts Visa, MasterCard, and Discover, debit, electronic check or money order.
  • The confirmation of payment will be issued to the student.
  • The confirmation form will be printed as proof to the program administrator.
  • The program administrator will then issue the Forensic Drug Testing Custody and Control Form.

How should students schedule their drug test?

  • Call the Ottumwa Regional Health Center Occupational Health at 641-684-2466 to set up a drug testing appointment.
  • Take the Forensic Drug Testing Custody and Control Form to the appointment at Ottumwa Regional Health Center Laboratory.
  • Results will be submitted to the Castle Branch Certified Background database from the lab testing site.
  • The student will receive an email to check their account for further information.

Who gets the results?

  • The test result will first be reported to the Medical Review Officer (MRO) associated with Castle Branch for review and interpretation.
  • The MRO will then report a confirmed positive test result to the student.
  • The MRO will attempt to call the student two times from this phone number 800-526- 9341. The hours of the follow up phone call will be between 8-5 EST.
  • Any questions regarding the results of any drug or alcohol test may be directed to the MRO.

Negative Results:

  • Negative Test Result: notice will be posted on the Castle Branch student account of passing the initial drug or alcohol test.

Positive Results:

  • Positive Test Result/Failed Test: The MRO will confirm any proof of the student prescriptions, and make any necessary updates to the positive test result.
  • Right to Secondary Confirmatory Test: A student with a confirmed positive test result may ask for a second confirmatory test using ONLY the results from the first test sample from another approved laboratory within seven days of the IHCC mailing of the positive test results to the student.
  • The confirmatory test will be conducted on a portion of the sample collected at the same time as the sample that produced the positive test result.
  • The student is responsible for the cost of second confirmatory test.
  • The sample of collection test will be split in the presence of the individual student to allow for the confirmatory testing of any initial positive test result.
  • During the confirmatory process, students may be suspended from the clinical and/or classroom experience.

Confirmed Positive Results:

  • Students with any confirmed positive results will be withdrawn from the program.

Legal Medication/Drugs Notification

  • ·A student must notify the clinical supervisor or program director whenever they are using a prescription or over-the-counter drug, which may affect safety or work- performance.
  • In making this determination, the student is responsible for consulting with their licensed healthcare professional and reviewing any warning on the label to determine if any medication or drug would adversely affect the student’s ability to safely perform essential functions of the clinical or classroom experience.
  • If the student is deemed by a Medical Doctor, Doctor of Osteopathy, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner to be safe during the clinical or classroom experience, a “release to attend clinical/classroom document” is required to be signed and kept in the student’s file at IHCC.
  • The student who does not fully disclose this information will be subject to possible disciplinary action which may lead to dismissal from the program.

Prescription medications that do not impair performance may be brought to the clinical site and should be taken as prescribed. All prescription drugs must be kept in the pharmacy dispensed container.

Testing due to reasonable suspicion:

  • Once a student is enrolled in the program, if there is a reasonable suspicion of drug or alcohol use, the Program Director will have the right to approve an additional drug or alcohol test at the student’s expense. The clinical site also has the right to request a drug/alcohol test at the student’s expense.

Reasonable suspicion may include, but is not limited to:

  • student behavior or conduct including physical manifestations
  • evidence that the involved student has caused or contributed to a clinical or classroom related accident
  • objective signs that the involved student may have used drugs or alcohol (i.e., slurred speech, staggering gait, odor of alcohol), or reports from others of a clinical “accident”, slurred speech, etc.

When a program director, faculty member or clinical instructor has suspicion of alcohol or drug use during the clinical experience, the following steps will be taken:

  • Remove student from the patient care area or assigned work area and notify the clinical instructor and the Program Director.
  • Consult  with  another  faculty,  clinical  instructor,  or  employee  for  verification  of suspicions in a confidential manner.
  • Upon verification by a second person, inform the student that they are relieved from duty and that there is a need “for cause” drug/alcohol screening.
  • If the student admits to alcohol and/or drug use, the student must undergo urine drug testing
  • Pending the resolution of any testing, the student will be suspended from clinical and/or classroom sites
  • A student subsequently found to have positive test results will be removed from the program.
  • All incidents involving “reasonable suspicion” drug testing in the clinical setting will be handled with strict confidentiality
  • Costs for “reasonable suspicion” drug testing are the student’s responsibility.

Transportation of student after reasonable suspicion:

  • An unimpaired person (such as a family member or friend) or taxi cab must transport the student to nearing testing facility. A release form must be signed by the person transporting the student and provided to the Clinical Supervisor/Program Director. If a taxi is transporting the student, the person observing the student enter the taxi may sign the release form and provide to the Clinical Supervisor/Program Director.
  • If the nearest testing facility is at the clinical site, student should be sent for testing and then an unimpaired individual or taxi cab should take the student home. If a taxi is transporting the student, the person observing the student enter the taxi may sign the release form.
  • While awaiting transport, the student should not be allowed to leave the supervisor’s presence or ingest any substances.
  • If the student insists on driving, either clinic supervisor or Program Director will notify law enforcement.
  • Pending the resolution of any testing, the student will be suspended from clinical and field sites.
  • A student subsequently found to have positive test results will be removed from the program.

If the student refuses “reasonable suspicion” testing:

  • Have an unimpaired individual or taxi take the student home
  • Document the following in writing:
    • Student behavior
    • Actions taken
    • Written statement of person verifying behaviors
    • Student’s response
  • Contact the Clinical Supervisor/Program Director as soon as possible and deliver written documentation to the Clinical Supervisor/Program Director within 3 days of the incident.
  • Students who refuse reasonable suspicion testing will be removed from the program.

If a facility other than the approved testing site at Ottumwa Regional Health Center performs drug/alcohol testing:

  • The student is obligated to notify the Program Director of any request by a clinical site for additional testing due to reasonable suspicion.
  • If tested by a clinical site, the student shall provide the Program Director with a copy of any test results.
  • Failure to promptly notify the Program Director shall be ground for dismissal from the program.
  • The student is responsible for any expense incurred with testing.

If a student voluntarily discloses a drug or alcohol problem:

  • If a student voluntarily discloses that hthey have an alcohol/drug problem and requests assistance, they are then referred to IHCC Student Health.
  • Students may be temporarily suspended from the program and/or clinical experience until such time as they have completed drug/alcohol treatment and are considered safe to return to both the classroom and clinical site by a Medical Doctor, Doctor of Osteopathy, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner.

Minor Students:

  • Any minor student under the age of 18 must abide by the drug and alcohol testing policy.
  • A parent or legal guardian of a student under the age of 18 must sign an acknowledgment of receipt of a copy of this policy.
  • Those students who are minors under the age of 18 must obtain notarized parental/legal guardian consent on Section II of the Drug/Alcohol Test Release & Consent for Minors.
  • Lack of consent for testing will disqualify the minor from continued clinical participation and participation in the Program.

Providing False Information:

  • Any student who provides false information when completing paperwork required for a drug test or when responding to required questions for an alcohol or drug screen test will be removed from the Program.
  • Any student who dilutes, contaminates, tampers with, alters or interferes in any way with the collection of a specimen for testing purposes will removed from the program.

Costs:

  • The costs of alcohol or drug rehabilitation, treatment and counseling will be the responsibility of the student.
  • Costs of drug/alcohol testing are the responsibility of the student

Clinical Laboratory Science Policies

Service Work

Occasionally, there are health fairs or blood drives for which the students may volunteer to help, which is fine as a volunteer.

It is the policy of the CLS programs that students will receive no financial remuneration for the clinical practicum experience.

Students are not allowed to work as regular staff (e.g. phlebotomist or tech) during the internship rotation. They must be supervised at all times, and cannot work independently as part of the laboratory staff.

Students may seek employment in the laboratory in which they are assigned for the clinical practicum. This is termed “service work” and must be performed outside the scheduled hours of the clinical practicum. Any service work must be non-compulsory, paid, supervised on site and subject to employee regulations.

Alternate and Clinical Waiting List

Students are offered admission to the program to begin coursework in the Fall term. The number of students admitted is based on the capacity of the clinical facilities to accommodate students. If there are not enough clinical sites to accommodate all students in a given year, selection will be made from an alternate list (clinical waiting list) based upon the student’s most recent numerical ranking (GPA).

 For more details refer to section under “Clinical Information”.

Outside Employment

Full time students are advised to limit outside employment to twenty hours per week and must arrange their work schedule so that it does not interfere with their educational objectives. Working more than 20 hours a week may impede student’s learning and affect his/her success in the program.

Students may NOT use scheduled work hours for their practicum/internship hours.

The program places restrictions on employment of students at affiliations where they are receiving clinical training. The restrictions imposed are:

  • students must not be working during the scheduled hours of training.
  • students should only be employed in the area and/or perform procedures which they have previously demonstrated competence and are considered entry-level.
  • students should not be employed in an area where there is no supervision.

Classroom Attendance

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all sessions of class.   Whether in attendance or not, the student is responsible for all information presented, in accordance with the course schedule.

  • Attendance records will be kept on each student for each course.
  • Advance notice TO THE INSTRUCTOR by the individual student (not a classmate) by phone or email IS REQUIRED.  (1 hr., minimum, prior to beginning of class.)
  • Students will not be allowed to make-up any work missed (classroom, quizzes, exams, or labs) unless prior notification has been made to the instructor.
  • To re-schedule any make-up  items, the student  must  initiate the process, and must  have contacted the instructor prior to the missed class.
  • If being given, unannounced quizzes will be given on time at the beginning of class. Unannounced quizzes cannot be made up. Points will be “0” for any missed unannounced quizzes. Even if the student is late to class, unannounced quizzes cannot be taken.

Missed Laboratory Exercises

The student must be in attendance in order to participate. Students are expected to have read the lab write-ups prior to the lab, where included in course, and to complete laboratory assignments. These are due as indicated on the schedule. Points will be awarded for participation in each lab.  If labs are missed, they may not be able to be made-up, and participation points will be lost, depending upon the exercise.

If labs can be made up, the student can only receive half the potential participation points.

Example below:

Possible Points
  On-Time Lab With Make-Up Lab No Make-Up Lab
Lab Participation (doing) 20 10 0
Lab Questions (correlating) 20 20 20

Note:

  • This works out to be only 75% of the potential score if make-up lab is available, or 50% of the potential score if no make-up lab is available. The student will need to be extra vigilant with the rest of the labs to pass the course lab component with the required 78%.
  • The student will be responsible for the concepts, content, and skills covered in the lab, whether in attendance or not. If the student is more than 5 minutes late, then participation points for that lab equals “0”. However, the student will be expected to stay and participate, as the competencies will still need to be accomplished for the course. Depending upon the individual exercises, the lab may not be able to be made-up; check with the instructor.

Missed Written Assignments

Students are expected to complete written assignments (modules and labs where indicated) on time. Any written assignments (modules, labs, etc.) that are submitted late (by the next class day) will receive only 90 % of the possible points. Any assignment submitted after that will receive “0”/no points.

Example below:

Possible Points
On Due Date 1 class day late 2 class days late
100% 90% 0%

Any additional assignments are at the discretion of the instructor.

Missed Quizzes/Exams

There will be no making up of scheduled major quizzes and exams for days that are missed by the student, unless prior arrangements were made by the student via personal conversation with the instructor. Unannounced quizzes cannot be made up: these points will be “0”.

Any quizzes or exams that are mutually arranged to be taken other than as scheduled will be taken at the Student Testing Center in Trustee Hall.   Exams must be taken when specified and may in a different/more difficult format (more essay, critical thinking or problem solving questions).

Student Injury

Student Injury On Campus

If a student is injured on campus, first aid supply cabinet is available in the CLS lab, room 16 RHEC. Please refer also to the IHCC Student Handbook, “Services” section, “Student Health Services” for more information and emergency phone numbers. Phone number for Student Health Services is 683-5336. IHCC Incident Report Form will also need to be completed.

Student Injury At Clinical Site

Accidents will be reported immediately to the Clinical Education Supervisor at the site. The CES will notify the Program Director and complete their incident report form. The student will be financially responsible for own medical treatment. IHCC Incident Report Form will also need to be completed.

Accidental/Health Insurance

If the student does not have health coverage, and desires to have it, coverage options may be purchased through Student Assurance Services, Inc. Contact the business office for rates and application information.

Patient Incident

If an incident, such as fainting during a phlebotomy procedure, occurs, the following must be done:

  • If a person on campus has an incident, the IHCC Incident Report Form will need to be completed by the instructor immediately.
  • If a patient at the clinical site has an incident, the IHCC Incident Report Form will also need to be completed in addition to the clinical site’s Incident Report form immediately.
  • This incident form will need to be submitted to the dean within 24 hours.

Academic Misconduct Policy

To view the full Academic Misconduct Policy, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Grading

Didactic

In didactic courses where there are laboratory components along with the lecture, the student must pass each component in order to pass the course. A minimum grade of a C (78 %) is required in BOTH the LECTURE and LABORATORY components of all Clinical Laboratory Science courses (MLT, CLA, and PBT). Within the LABORATORY component, each sub-group must be passed with a minimum of a C (78 %). Students must also pass all Practical Examinations for each course. Failure to meet the minimum passing score in both the lecture and laboratory components will result in the earned grade of the failed component for the course, and the course will need to be retaken.

Clinical

The practicum courses for MLT/CLA programs consist of multiple disciplines (exc. the phlebotomy internships for MLT and PBT students). Students must pass all disciplines in each practicum course.

For more details refer to “Clinical Section” and Clinical Education Guide.

Program Probation/Dismissal, Withdrawals, Re-Entry

Probation

Upon failure to achieve a “C” in a core/support course or discipline, the student will be placed on academic probation. The course must be repeated before progression in the program is continued.

Dismissal involving didactic coursework

Students may apply to re-enter their Program one time after dismissal/withdrawal from the program (involving didactic program courses), following the re-entry procedure outlined below. If > 1 academic year has passed since the student has been in the program, the student will be required to re-apply and complete competency assessments for each core discipline course, either written or psychomotor or any combination thereof. Failure to successfully complete these assessments will require the repeating of the core course(s). The student will be responsible for any financial costs incurred for the repeating these courses.

If the student originally failed the didactic course(s), the student must re-take the course(s) completely, the next time it is offered.

If a student fails a (second) core course, they will be dismissed from the program, without the opportunity to re-enter.

Students re-admitted into the program have only one opportunity to reinstate and complete the program. Any subsequent core course failures will result in dismissal from the program, and the student will not be accepted for re-entry into the program. For students who have been re-admitted into the program, subsequent re-admissions for any personal/medical leaves will be considered on an individual basis.

Re-Entry Procedure

To be considered for re-entry, a student must:

  • Submit a written request the program director within 6 months of withdrawal or dismissal, stating the Term and Year in which they wish to return.
    • If student plans to continue general education coursework at IHCC, they will need to complete a Change of Major form for re-entry with the Program Director.
    • If student does not plan to continue general education coursework at IHCC, they will need to complete a new application prior to re-entering the program.
  • Meet current program entrance requirements.
  • Meet program curriculum requirements for the academic year in which they are re-instated.
  • Follow the program policies and procedures in that are in place the year of reinstatement.

Students re-entering the program must successfully complete standard assessments for the previously completed discipline courses in order to ensure that the previous knowledge and skills are brought forward into the program as current, as well as to help ensure success during the future clinical/internship experiences. These standard assessments consist of written and practical examinations for each course previously and successfully completed. This is done in the real world, as professional competencies are assessed annually.

Continuing students will be given priority over re-entering students to ensure adequate space in the class.

Dismissal involving clinical/internship discipline coursework

The practicum courses for MLT/CLA programs consist of multiple disciplines in each practicum course (exceptions; the phlebotomy internships for MLT and PBT students).

If one discipline in MLT/CLA Practicum Courses is failed, the student will receive a grade of “I” and have one opportunity to repeat and successfully complete the failed discipline in a different affiliate site, to be completed by the end of the summer term immediately following graduation.

If two or more disciplines are failed in either the same or subsequent terms in MLT/CLA Practicum/Clinical courses, the student will receive an “F” for those failed disciplines and respective course(s). The student will not be allowed to continue in the program. The student will not be allowed to apply for re-admission into the program.

Voluntary/Temporary Withdrawals

The option to withdraw ends two (2) weeks prior to the end of any term. Please also refer to the IHCC Student Handbook for withdrawal policies and procedures. The student will be given a “W” for the course(s). Students are expected to consult the Program Director to complete the process.

Students in good standing may voluntarily and temporarily withdraw from a program. The student must initiate the process, and begin the process with the Program Director who has the forms. The student will then need to re-apply to the program to continue. Refer to previous Re-Entry Policy and procedures.

Part Time

If a student desires to go part time in the MLT or CLA programs, prior arrangements must be made with the Program Director. Contracts will then be designed on an individual basis. The student will be expected to sign and follow the contract in order to successfully complete the particular program.

Classroom Electronic Device/Cell Phone

Cell phones and any electronic devices must be placed in your book bag/purse, and either turned “off” or set on vibrate only, absolutely no audio. There is to be no talking or texting on the cell phone during class time. If you have a medical reason/emergency (with prior approval of instructor), you may leave the room to answer the phone (do not talk in the room). Otherwise, you may deal with any phone calls/messages during a class break. Anyone caught using a cell phone in any way during class time will be asked to leave for the day. Repeated offenses may result in dismissal from the program. It is very disrespectful and rude to interrupt your instructor or to disturb your classmates with phone conversations or electronic device sounds.

Student Files/Records

An on-going file is maintained in the Program office for each student enrolled in the Programs. These records are confidential and are only accessible to those directly involved in the student’s education and to any student requesting inspection of his/her records.

Student program files contain (each category is a separate file):

General/didactic

  • Advisement/Counseling Notation Sheet
  • Deficiency Notification by Instructor, if applicable
  • Copies of any disciplinary letters/forms
  • Attendance Records
  • Student File Checklist
  • All signature forms (contracts, confidentiality, essential functions, etc)
  • Professional Performance Evaluations and other evaluations.

Health

  • In a separate file are all health related items, such as the completed physical exam forms, immunizations, declination forms, health insurance, etc.

Clinical

Another separate file contains:

  • Clinical Professional Performance Evaluations, Practical and written examinations, and Task Performance Checklist.
  • Any disciplinary letters and related documentation.

Upon the student’s successful completion of his/her program, the above files will be merged.

Student college academic files are maintained in Admissions and contain:

  • High School Transcript
  • College Transcripts (if applicable)
  • Application
  • Compass scores, etc.

Leave of Absence

Leave of Absences (such as for funerals or maternity) will be handled on an individual basis. These will be at the discretion of the Program Director, and must be approved prior. If it involves clinical experiences, then the Clinical Coordinator must be involved as well in order to coordinate details with the clinical sites.

Pregnancy

When the student has a physician’s confirmation of pregnancy, the student will secure a signed statement from her family physician, or obstetrician, assuring that her condition will not be an impairment of her active continuation in the respective CLS program. Every attempt will be made to accommodate the student’s completion of the program. However, being unable to attend the classes and labs may impact this, and it may be necessary for the student to withdraw and re-apply and re-enter the program the next year.

Invasive Procedures Policy

Students enrolled in any of the Clinical Laboratory Science Programs will be expected to demonstrate competencies in venipuncture and dermal puncture by safely performing these skills on fellow students. These are required components of the phlebotomy core in all the initial program courses. Not only will the student demonstrate these skills on other students but they will allow other students to demonstrate the same skills on them. All students in the program will be asked to sign a release form to allow for the performances of these competencies.

To ensure that these competencies are safely accomplished, the following standards will be strictly followed:

  • Prior to demonstration of these procedures, all students will exhibit knowledge and understanding of Universal/Standard Precautions and will demonstrate/describe proper protocols.
  • The following processes will be used in teaching these skills:
    • The principles and procedures will be taught in the classroom.
    • There will be a step-by-step demonstration of the skills by the instructor, via either live performance or video tape.
    • After the demonstration, students will practice on the artificial arms, following the designated competency checklist.
    • Once the student has successfully completed a check-off list on the artificial arms, the student will demonstrate the competency procedures on fellow students. During these competency checks, the instructor will be observing the procedures and completing a skills evaluation. Fellow students will also be observing the processes from their competency checklist.
  • For the learning of these skills and competencies, the student will:
    • Perform venipunctures and dermal punctures on fellow students as a part of the educational experience.
    • Allow fellow students to perform venipunctures and dermal punctures on him-/herself.
    • Following an adequate amount of practices, be allowed a maximum number of 3 attempts to pass each competency.

If during the performance of these skills a student/person has an incident (e.g., faints), the instructor will need to complete an IHCC Incident Form, make a copy for the Program Director, and then turn in the original to the Dean.

Health Sciences Certifications

Required Certifications

The following are required of all students in all Health Sciences programs:

Health Certifications – include:

  • HIPAA (Confidentiality)
  • Blood Borne Pathogens
  • Child Abuse Mandatory Reporting
  • Adult Abuse Mandatory Reporting

These are on-line courses, and there are no course points associated with these (they are P/F). These will be taken during the first term of all CLS programs, and must be completed by the end of the 3rd  week of the course. These are required by the state of Iowa. No clinical rotation assignments can be made until these are completed.

Blood Borne Pathogens & HIV Policy

Students may be participating in activities within the Health Sciences Programs, which have potential for exposure to infectious diseases including but not limited to Hepatitis B and HIV. Health Science students must take all necessary precautions to minimize the risk of exposure. Students who fail to comply with the blood borne pathogen and HIV policy may be asked to withdraw from the programs.

In the event of a significant exposure (e.g. an occupational incident involving eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious material, including saliva), the student must report the incident immediately to the instructor or clinical supervisor. The Instructor will file a Safety/Loss/Incident Report Form describing the incident. The completed form will be submitted to the Dean of Health Science.

Follow-up evaluation will be required consistent with Federal regulations. This may involve going to their personal physician or the emergency room. Students are responsible for the cost of their own medical care.

Vaccine

Vaccination is the only available means of protection against Hepatitis B. No currently available therapy has proven effective in eliminating the infection. This vaccine, prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, is free of association with human blood or blood products. Full immunization requires three doses of the vaccine over a six month period. Because of the long incubation period for Hepatitis B, it is possible for unrecognized infection to be present at the time the vaccine is given, and in that case, the vaccine would not prevent development of clinical hepatitis. If the student chooses not to have the vaccination, then a waiver must be signed and put in his/her file.

Post Exposure Procedure for Health Sciences Students

If a student has been exposed to a contaminant parenterally (needle stick or cut) or superficially through a mucous membrane (eye or mouth) they are to follow the following procedure:

  • Immediately wash the affected area with the appropriate solution (soap and water, alcohol, water),
  • Seek appropriate medical attention through their personal physician (students are responsible for their own medical care). This may include baseline testing for HIV antibody at this time, followed by recommended series of testing. (Physicians may also inquire about the student’s status in regard to tetanus and hepatitis immunization at this time.)
  • Follow institutional (agency) policy regarding determining HIV and hepatitis status of patient, (students are responsible for the cost of any testing)\
  • Maintain confidentiality of patient,
  • Seek appropriate counseling regarding risk of infection.

Confidentiality Policy

All patient information that students have access to is personal and private. Violations would include, but not be limited to:

  • discussing information about a patient in an inappropriate setting, or with someone not related to the care of the patient;
  • taking pictures of the patient for personal keeping;
  • exposing a patient unnecessarily;
  • inappropriate handling of personal possessions of the patient, such as going through a patient’s purse/wallet without authorization by the patient;

Posting any information relating to patient care or clinical experiences on computer social networking sites is a HIPAA violation and is strictly prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • pictures or text that include the name of a facility;
  • dates relating to experiences;
  • type of treatment or experience that the student was involved with;
  • patient name or personal information (ie: age, diagnosis, personal circumstances);
  • facility staff names or conversations;
  • or specifics of any treatment or interaction with patients, families, or staff.

All students will adhere to the HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) regulations of the facility they are attending.

Any violation of the “patient right” is a HIPAA violation and could be cause for dismissal.

Sexual Misconduct Policy

To view the full Sexual Misconduct Policy, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook or the college website.

Professionalism

Students are expected to act professionally both in the classroom setting and at the clinical sites. This means treating all peers, instructors, and others with respect – being courteous and polite, not speaking critically or derogatorily of others, and being cooperative and helpful without having to be asked. Students will be evaluated on this professional component throughout the program in these settings.

Student Laboratory Safety Policies and Procedures

The following list of policies and procedures addresses certain considerations applicable to the safe and orderly use of the medical laboratory facilities. This list does not encompass all of the requirements and procedures practiced in a “safe” clinical laboratory. For more information on clinical laboratory safety consult the safety manuals available at the clinical affiliated hospitals.

Proper Attire and Grooming

  • CLS scrubs are to be worn during all CLS didactic course labs, as well as during the clinical practica/internships at the affiliated hospitals. These are purchased through the campus bookstore. Pants (scrubs or khaki slacks) must be full length; NO SHORTS are allowed during the lab sessions.
  • Laboratory coats are to be worn buttoned during ALL laboratory sessions. Do not wear laboratory coats outside of the laboratory/classroom.
  • Coats, sweaters, boots, etc. must be left OUTSIDE the laboratory work area, in the lecture area.
  • Shoes are to be comfortable, leather, skid-resistant, impervious to moisture, and cover the entire foot (lace, Velcro tabs, or loafer type). Sandals, clogs, or flip flops are unacceptable.
  • Hair must be secured back off the shoulder to prevent it from coming into contact with patient arms/hands, or any contaminated materials/surfaces, or moving parts of equipment, such as a centrifuge.
    • Beards must be given the same precaution.

Safe Practices

  • DO NOT SMOKE, EAT, or DRINK in the laboratory area (this includes gum). Never place food items in the laboratory refrigerator or oven. Never use glassware as food containers.
  • Within the lecture area only beverages in bottles with screw caps may be consumed.
  • Do not place fingers or objects (such as pens or pencils) in your mouth.
  • Wash hands thoroughly before, after and during lab, especially after handling potentially infectious material.
  • Handle all biological materials (e.g. blood, urine, stool, controls, etc.) as though infectious. Use gloves when processing blood, body fluids or any reagents from human origins.
  • If you get a hazardous material in your mouth, DON’T SWALLOW. Spit out the material immediately. At the nearest faucet, rinse out your mouth many times using a total of at least one gallon of water.
  • If at any time you think you have been contaminated with potentially infectious material, notify the instructor.
  • If at any time you think your health status (e.g., pregnancy or severe illness) may limit your performance or be endangered by factors present in the clinical laboratory environment, notify the Program Director immediately.
  • Know the location and proper use of the
    • fire extinguisher                                                                 
    • eye wash                                                                                
    • safety shower                                                                     
    • spill control kit                                                                                   
    • first aid kit
    • Emergency Phone Numbers
      • From IHCC phones: 9-911
      • IHCC Security from IHCC phones: 5300
      • IHCC Security from cell phones: 641-683-5300
  • No student may work alone/unsupervised in the laboratory without the permission of an instructor.
  • Safety consciousness signs are posted and are to be observed and obeyed.
  • It is the responsibility of the faculty using student laboratory facilities to conduct a safety orientation for their students concerning the rules and safety devices in the lab.
  • Procedures performed in the student laboratory may include the use of caustic, hazardous and toxic materials. Protective equipment such as rubber gloves and splash goggles are available if the need arises.
    • Protective eyewear, masks, or face shields must be worn during procedures that are likely to generate aerosols (e.g. droplets of blood or other body fluids) to prevent exposure of mucous membranes of the mouth, nose and eyes.
  • Notify your instructor immediately if any instruments give electrical shocks.

Cleanliness and Housekeeping

  • Keep books, binders, papers and other objects away from the lab work area. The only necessary items that should be in your work area are your lab procedures, lab result pages, and any lab equipment with which you are working.
  • Clean the tops of laboratory benches and mats in your work area and the phlebotomy chairs with the designated disinfectant solution before and after each lab session.
  • Dispose of waste materials appropriately:
    • Non-contaminated materials (non-broken glass), i.e., paper towels, kimwipes, etc., are to be discarded in a regular wastebasket.
    • Contaminated/bio-hazard materials (kim-wipes, gauze, vacutainer/microtainer tubes containing blood, micro-pipet tips, Micro loops, etc.) go in the designated bio-hazard buckets on the     bench tops. At the end of the labs, remove the biohazard bags, tie the top of the bags, and     place in the larger floor model biohazard metal containers.
    • Contaminated glass slides go into the cardboard safe-keepers, placed in the biohazard buckets on the bench tops. When these are full, fold over the tops, tape shut, and place in the larger floor model biohazard metal containers.
    • Sharps, such as needles (for veins or skin), go in to the sharps containers. When these are full, seal containers, and place in the larger floor model biohazard metal containers.
    • Broken glass (non-contaminated) goes into the designated cardboard broken glass container on the counter.
  • Dilute water-soluble solutions can be emptied into the sink, with copious amounts of running (not splashing) water.
  • Organic solvents are not to be poured down the drain. Contact the chemistry department for disposal instructions.

Pipets and Glassware

  • Always use pipet bulbs and other devices when pipetting. Pipetting by mouth is not permitted!!
  • Label all glassware/plastic ware before using, except for pipets.
  • Pipet are to be placed after use in the designated container that is filled with water, gently with the tip down.
    • If something hazardous, such as concentrated acid, has been used, carefully rinse the pipet under the faucet with running water, and then gently lower the pipet, tip down, into the designated pipet container filled with water.
    • The lab assistant will clean the pipets according to specified instructions.
  • After all labs, the student is responsible for cleaning his/her own glassware. Instructions are posted above the glassware sink by the water purifier system. As soon as possible after using it, all glassware is to be emptied and placed into the plastic pan in the sink filled with glassware detergent. They are to be filled and emptied 3X with the soapy water, then filled and emptied 3X with tap water to rinse off any detergent residue, the filled and rinsed 3X with the deionized water (in 5-gallon container with spigot next to sink) to rinse off the tap water. Place all test tubes upside down into wire mesh baskets to dry. Place all other glassware (flasks, etc.) onto drying rack to air-dry.

All students will asked to sign and return the Students Laboratory Agreement indicating that he/she has read these safety policies and procedures and agree to comply with them.

Academic Information

Grading/Evaluations Grades

Grades in both didactic and clinical program courses will be based upon several types of evaluations.

Didactic courses:

  • Cognitive: Exams,   quizzes,   homework   modules,   situational   problems,   case   studies,   and independent projects
  • Psychomotor: Performance of competencies, lab exercises, practical exams
  • Affective: Professional Performance Evaluation (PPE)

Grades

In order to graduate, a student must receive a passing grade in all courses listed for that major and achieve a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 or above. This is equivalent to a “C” average.

Any student whose current term GPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on academic probation for the next term. Academic probation may affect financial aid. The student is encouraged to see a financial aid counselor for clarification of an individual situation.

Students who fail to achieve a 2.0 GPA during their probationary term may then be dismissed from their current program or from the college. Students not dismissed must have permission from their department chair and from the registrar to re-enroll for the next term. Very poor work in any term, however, may result in dismissal at the close of that term.

Students who are unable to complete assigned work in a course may be given a grade of “I” (incomplete). Students must complete the assigned work as soon as possible (at the discretion of the instructor/ department chair), but no later than six weeks into the following term. Grades for courses left with an “I” past the six-week completion period will automatically convert to “F”, unless an alternate date is entered by the instructor.

To progress through the CLS programs a student must achieve a passing grade in all prerequisite courses, “C” (78%). (Please refer to program policy dealing with the passing of both lecture and laboratory components of courses.) If a student fails a prerequisite course they must consult with the program director and receive permission of the Health Occupations Dean to continue in the program.

Program grading is based upon the following percentage scale:

% Scale Letter Grade Numerical Grade
93-100 A 4
85-92 B 3
78-84 C 2
75-77 D 1
0-74 F 0

Note: Students must pass the Final Practical Examination in all discipline-specific courses in order to pass the specific discipline course. These courses inc

MLTs CLAs
Hematology
Immunology
Immunohematology
Urinalysis
Parasitology & Mycology
Clinical Chemistry
Clinical Microbiology
Clinical Laboratory Basics II
Clinical Laboratory Basics III

Computing the GPA
(Grade Point Average)

The student may compute his/her GPA at any time by following this example:

Course Credit Hours x Numerical Grade = Grade Points
Human Anatomy 3 C (2) 6
Composition I 3 B (3) 9
Clinical Lab Fundamentals 3 C (2) 6
Totals 9 21
Credit Hours Attempted = 9 Total Grade Points = 21

GPA = Total Grade Points divided by Credit Hours Attempted

21/9 = 2.3 GPA

The student should check any individual grade questions immediately with the instructor who issued the grade. If you have questions regarding your GPA, contact the program director.

Testing

  • Written tests and practical examinations may be given throughout each course.
  • Each instructor will determine the test schedule and content of the tests.
  • Each student must notify the course instructor prior to test time if they are going to be absent, in order to make alternative arrangements.
  • The classroom assignment make-up process must be initiated by the student.
  • Final examinations, when given, are scheduled for each course at the end of each term.
  • Refer to the course syllabi for grading specifics.
  • Any missed unannounced quizzes cannot be made up.

During  any  testing  situation,  there  are  to  be  no  electronic  devices  (cell  phones,  iPods,  etc),  or programmable calculators in use.

Appeal of Final Grade Policy

To view the full Appeal of Final Grade Policy, please visit the College Catalog & Student Handbook.

Clinical Information

Rules and Regulations

Students are expected to adhere to all rules and regulations as described by college student handbook and program policy manuals. The student is expected to also follow all rules and regulations of the clinical facility where they are training. Students may be dismissed for breaking any rule set by the clinical site as well as the college.

Violation of program/academic/clinical policies/rules/regulations that results in dismissal from a clinical site will result in dismissal from the program with no option for internship at another site.

More specific rules and policies dealing with internships/practica are included in the Clinical Education Guides (CEGs) for each program, and will be reviewed just prior to the appropriate practicum.

Attendance

Consistent attendance and punctuality are essential for success in Clinical Education. Students are expected to be present each day of clinical practice. An attendance log sheet will be used for each program’s discipline, with CLA being a modification. In any case of absence or tardiness the student is required to telephone the departmental clinical instructor or his/her designee at least 1 hour prior to the scheduled starting time.  Sstudents must also contact the affiliate CES and IHCC Clinical Coordinator to notify of absence or tardy.  As with any employee, the student will need backup plans for sick children, as the student is still expected to show up for clinicals as would be expected of any employee.  Students with excessive tardies or leave earlies or absences are in jeopardy of being placed on probation and/or being dismissed from clinical practice.

Note: The CES at the affiliate site will immediately notify the Clinical Coordinator at IHCC upon the first infraction of any part of this attendance policy, either tardies or absences.

  • An attendance log sheet will be kept on each student for each discipline (CLA and PBT will have one log sheet for all). All students must sign-in and sign-out, with all times verified by the teaching/supervising technologist/technician and comments may be added. The site will contact the IHCC Clinical Coordinator of any deviation from this policy.
  • All absences must be made up at a time and manner convenient for the affiliate site. Options might include so many hours added on to subsequent days, or days during school breaks (e.g., spring or summer breaks).
  • Students are to work the shift that is regularly scheduled by the affiliate’s site for that department/discipline. No adjustments are allowed.
  • A tardy is defined as anything > 5 minutes after the scheduled starting time.
  • Students with excessive tardies/leave earlies or absences are in jeopardy of being placed on probation and/or being dismissed from clinical practice. Anything > 3 tardies or leave earlies will result in dismissal from the program.
  • Students are allowed 2 absences, maximum, per term – 1 excused (>24 hr notice) and 1 unexcused (<24 hr or same morning notice). Anything more than 4 absences and the student will be dismissed from the program.
  • First ‘no call’ results in probation. Second ‘no call’ results in dismissal from the program.
Item Probation Dismissal
No call/No Show 1 2
Tardies/Leave Earlies 2 3
Absences 2* 4

*If the student is sick longer than 2 days, arrangements for a “Leave of Absence” must be made with the Program Director, and a Doctor’s excuse is needed for approval of an extended leave.

Leave of Absence:

Any “Leave of Absence” for extended absences (more than 2 days), such as:

  • Funeral of an immediate family member
  • Extended illness of 3 or more days

must also be arranged and approved with the Program Director. Special arrangements will need to be made for time blocks to make up this many days with the affiliate, which may then occur during school breaks or over the summer term.

Note: Vacations do not qualify for “Leave of Absence”. Vacations are only allowed during regularly scheduled school breaks, and then only if there is no time to be made up with the clinical sites.

Alternate and Clinical Waiting List

Students are offered admission to the program to begin coursework in the Fall term.

The CLS policy states (stated under “CLS Policies” section of this manual):
“The number of students admitted is based on the capacity of the clinical facilities to accommodate students. If there are not enough clinical sites to accommodate all students in a given year, selection will be made from an alternate list (clinical waiting list) based upon the student’s most recent numerical ranking (GPA).”

Students are assigned to the clinical sites near the end of the term just prior to the practica/internships. Students will complete a Clinical Preference form and indicate his/her first, second, and third choices for internship sites, and the reason for the first choice. Every effort will be made to place a student in his/her first choice, if possible. However, there are other factors (such as the number of students’ applying to that same site) that will also need to be considered by the program officials. The decision made by the program officials will be final.

In the event that more students are admitted to the program than the availability of clinical site placement, students will be assigned clinical placement based upon their current GPA. Students not receiving clinical placement will be placed on the alternate waiting list and given priority over the next year’s assignments. If the student does not receive a “C” in the core courses or specified supportive courses, the student will be unable to participate in any practicum experiences.

Clinical Grading/Evaluations

Grades in both didactic and clinical program courses will be based upon several types of evaluations.

Clinical courses:

  • Cognitive: Exams, quizzes, homework/exercises
  • Psychomotor: Task Performance Checklist, practical exams (actual or role play)
  • Affective: Clinical Professional Performance Evaluation (CPPE)

The student will be placed on probation, receive an “I” (incomplete) for a given clinical discipline/section, and will have to repeat that section, if any of the following occurs:

  • Fails to achieve a 78% (C), minimum, in each of the clinical areas (task checklist, DER, & CPPE) of that lab discipline/section.
  • Fails to achieve a 78% (C), minimum on the practical examination for that lab section. (Section/department = Phlebotomy, Hematology, etc)

The practicum courses for MLT/CLA programs consist of multiple disciplines (exceptions; the phlebotomy internships for MLT and PBT students).

If one discipline in MLT/CLA Practicum Courses is failed, the student will receive a grade of “I” and have one opportunity to repeat and successfully complete the failed discipline in a different affiliate site.

Students will be expected to complete an “I” received in either practicum by the end of the summer term following CLA Term III or MLT Term VIII.

If two or more disciplines in MLT/CLA Practicum courses are failed, the student will receive a grade of “F” and will be dismissed from the program. Refer to section on “Re-Admission/Re-Entry into Program after Dismissal”.

One core course may be repeated one time and subsequent core course failures will result in dismissal from the program. If two or more core courses in the same term are failed (less than 78 %), the student will be allowed to repeat the failed courses one time. Students may re-apply to re-enter their Program one time.

This will be further delineated in the Clinical Education Guide for each program.

In each discipline/lab section, there are 4 components to the student internship grade for that discipline:

Component Weighting for Total Grade
Task Performance Checklist 20% (Need 78%, C, minimum)
Departmental Examinations (DERs)
      Quizzes - 20%
      Practical - 80% *
30% (Need 78%, C, minimum)
Clinical Professional Performance Evaluations
      All CPPEs summarized ***
25% (Need 78%, C, minimum)
Standardized Final Written Examination 25%

*If no quizzes are given, the practical will constitute 100 % of this portion.

** The grid for converting the CPPE 5-pt scale to % is located in the Clinical Education Guide that is distributed prior to the first practicum/internship course.

The final grade for the clinical education courses will be compiled by the Clinical Coordinator.

Since the clinical practica are Pass/Fail courses, the student will need to receive a 78 %, “C”, for each discipline or the complete course in order to receive the grade of “Pass”.

Re-Entry Into Program After Dismissal

Dismissal involving clinical/internship discipline coursework: 

The practicum courses for MLT/CLA programs consist of multiple disciplines in each practicum course (exceptions; the phlebotomy internships for MLT and PBT students).

If one discipline in MLT/CLA Practicum Courses is failed, the student will receive a grade of “I” and have one opportunity to repeat and successfully complete the failed discipline in a different affiliate site, to be completed by the end of the summer term immediately following graduation.

If two or more disciplines are failed in either the same or subsequent terms in MLT/CLA Practicum/Clinical courses, the student will receive an “F” for those failed disciplines and respective course(s). The student will not be allowed to continue in the program. The student will not be allowed to apply for re-entry into the program.

Clinical Electronic Device

In order to:

  • Focus on patient care, where the laboratory is an integral part of the delivery of high quality diagnostic health care services, and
  • Minimize distractions and time away from the department and its functions, and
  • Allow the clinical affiliate laboratory department to run with maximum efficiency and attention to detail,

the following Electronic Device Policy has been developed for our students at the clinical site:

Use of personal electronic devices is unnecessary and acts as a distraction during normal laboratory operations. Personal electronic devices are to be turned off while the students are “on the clock” during the daily practicum experiences. The personal electronic devices may be used during the student’s break/lunch, but must be returned to the off position once the student returns to the workplace. If anybody needs to contact the student in case of an emergency, they may call the laboratory on the institution’s regular phone, or leave a message for the student to call back during break/lunch.

Electronic devices include, but are not limited to:

  • iPod or other MP3 audio player
  • Palm pilot or other PDA type devices
  • Cellular telephones
  • Portable media players such as DVD or CD players
  • TENS or musculoskeletal stimulator units except at the written direction of a physician due to electrical field interferences.
  • Net pads or Net books (including iPads)
  • Electronic readers
  • Hand held games
  • Pagers

This means no audio, verbal, or texting. Any non-work related electronic device must be turned off and must remain off during working hours. If the student needs a timing device, then a watch can be used.

Any violation of this policy may result in dismissal from the program.

Clinical Affiliates

Hospitals are chosen to provide experiences which supplement, complement and enrich the Program. The Clinical Laboratory Department must demonstrate an interest in the training program, have the ability to instruct, and be committed to supporting the efforts and requirements of the educational program.

Hospitals selected to participate in the internship processes are accredited by TJC (The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations), CAP (College of American Pathologists), CLIA, or equivalent, and have current signed affiliation agreements with IHCC.

If the site selected does not provide complete microbiology services, then the student will need to complete this discipline at a supplemental site for the rest of the designated time. Any supplemental sites will be assigned by program officials, based upon willingness of the cooperative sites. Please note, that these sites may not be close geographically. The students will indicate their 3 preferences, and the decision of actual placement will be made by the program officials.

Teach Out Plan

In the event that any of the CLS Programs are to be closed, either due to unforeseen natural disasters or administrative decisions, the following policies will be followed by the college, CLS program faculty, and any of its clinical affiliates.

In the event of a closure:

  • No new students will be admitted into any program.
  • Any students that are currently enrolled in any program and its course(s) will be able to complete the degree/diploma programs within a reasonable amount of time.
  • Students will not be allowed to bridge into any other program, but may complete their current designated program, which may be up to two years.
  • The program courses will continue to be taught by current faculty and clinical sites until the program is completed and the students have received their degrees or diplomas.
  • Should a student have difficulties with progression through the programs, it may be necessary to develop individualized plans for completion or alternate degree plans.
  • Any clinical affiliate site that is currently being utilized for any students’ internships or practica will continue to provide training, following the designated schedule, until the students have completed the requirements of the program(s).
  • IHCC Administration will continue to employ the CLS faculty and staff until the actual closing of the program:
    • The Program Director continue to teach her designated courses, and begin the processes of saving student files, program records and administrative files.
    • The Instructor/Clinical Coordinator will remain until the program closes as well, In addition to teaching her designated courses and coordinated the necessary clinical internships, she will also help sort through, merge, compile, and save the program files.
    • The Lab Assistant shall remain on staff until program closes. The Lab Assistant will need to order supplies for each of the remaining courses and assist with labs until the end, at which time, she will help close dispose of and/or distribute to other college departments any usable program supplies and equipment.

In support of this plan, Indian Hills Community College policies indicate a commitment to continue the program until all enrolled students have completed the program.

Articulation Agreements

MLT AD to MLS BS Programs

Allen College, Waterloo, IA;

There is an articulation agreement in place between Indian Hills Community College and Allen College in Waterloo, IA for their MLT-to-MLS program. Allen College will accept full transfer of IHCC general education and major field requirements for Medical Laboratory Technology into the Degree Advancement Option (DAO) of the Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) track of Allen College’s Bachelor of Health Science (BHS) degree program. This agreement enables qualified IHCC students to gain admission to Allen College for the purpose of earning the BHS degree.

Qualified students are those students who:

  • Have earned as Associates in Applied Science (AAS) degree with a major in Medical Laboratory Technology at IHCC, and
  • Are certified Medical Laboratory Technicians.

This is an on-line program that can be done from where the IHCC MLT graduate is currently employed. The student/graduate can visit their website for more information on the program, available financial aid, or any other information at www.allencollege.edu. They may also contact the program director, Brenda Barnes, at her email Brenda.barnes@allencollege.edu.

The program at Allen College is fully accredited by NAACLS.

Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN:

Another MLT-to-MLS program that is totally on-line and will not require any additional clinical experiences is Austin Peay State University. Their only requirement is 2 years work experience as a certified professional MLT by August 1st of the year the student would begin the MLT-to-MLS program. One of their strengths is the low student to faculty ratio (4 faculty to about 40 online students per year).

Feel free to contact Jane Semler below for more information regarding this MLT-to-MLS program at Austin Peay State University:

Jane Semler, MS, MT (ASCP) Associate Professor
Coordinator MLT-MLS Program
Austin Peay State University
College of Science and Mathematics
Department of Allied Health Sciences
Medical Laboratory Science Program
601 College Street
PO Box 4668
Clarksville, TN 37044  
semlerj@apsu.edu
Office:  SSC A211
P: 931-221-7796
F: 931-221-6452

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